Occupational Therapy Month


What do playing with play-do, climbing on a rock wall, organizing school supplies and learning how to cook have in common? All of these activities may be happening right now in an  Occupational Therapy (OT) session at New Horizons Wellness Services.

April is National Occupational Therapy Month. If you know an Occupational Therapist, ask them to share a story about someone that they helped this week. Chances are, it will bring a smile to your face.

Occupational Therapists help their clients live life to the fullest!

Many people are confused by the title “occupational therapy,” because the term “occupation” is generally associated with jobs adults perform. However, there is a broader view of “occupations” that includes being able to do the activities that are important to us every day. In OT, clients gain the ability to thrive in home, community, school or work.  The goal of OT may be to increase performance levels, to restore functioning to a prior level, or to maintain current skills or prevent regression.

At New Horizons Wellness Services, occupational therapists provide evaluation, intervention and consultation in motor skills, social interaction and play skills, sensory processing, executive functions for planning and organizing, pain management, self care and self regulation skills. In addition, we make home programs and recommendations for environmental adaptations for home and school settings.

Pediatric OT is focused on working with children from toddlers through 18. We love working with teenagers to overcome the challenges  of middle and high school. We help teens to develop the necessary skills so their transition into adulthood follows a path to an independent and rewarding life. Adult occupational therapy works with adults who are either seeking services for the first time due to new challenges or those who have done OT in the past,  but need updated home programs or help to overcome a new challenge.

Our occupational therapy team gets excited about helping clients be able to do the little things that are important to them every day. For example, we build skills such as tying  shoes, getting dressed, being able to sit and focus on homework, making dinner, playing a game with a friend or learning what to do when feeling overwhelmed or overstimulated.

To learn more about OT in general, visit the American Occupational Therapy Association’s web page at www.aota.org. If you have questions about how OT can help you or a family member, contact our office at 503-352-0240 and ask to speak to one of our Occupational Therapists.